Library

The library contains a wealth of information on the circular economy for use by policy makers and analysts conducting impact assessments. For more information on impact assessments and the EU's Better Regulation Agenda, please click here.

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    Utilization of structural steel in buildings

    Type of evidence: 

    Author names: 

    Muiris C. Moynihan, Julian M. Allwood

    Source: 

    Year: 

    2014

    "Over one-quarter of steel produced annually is used in the construction of buildings. Making this steel causes carbon dioxide emissions, which climate change experts recommend be reduced by half in the next 37 years. One option to achieve this is to design and build more efficiently, still delivering the same service from buildings but using less steel to do so. To estimate how much steel could be saved from this option, 23 steel-framed building designs are studied, sourced from leading UK engineering firms. The utilization of each beam is found and buildings are analysed to find patterns...

    The Litte Book of Biofuels

    Type of evidence: 

    Source: 

    BirdLife International, European Environmental Bureau (EEB), Transport & Environment (T&E)

    Year: 

    2014

    "With the launch of the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) in 2009, Europe’s demand for biofuels has skyrocketed. To meet this new demand, the global production of biofuels has also increased significantly. In fact, did you know that every car in Europe uses a blend of biofuels? That’s how common this product has become. Biofuels use vegetable oils, cereals, sugars and waste fats – mainly extracted from rapeseed, soy, palm trees, corn and wheat – to create energy. Because biofuels are derived from plant products, any increase or decrease in their use has a direct impact on agriculture...

    Synopsis

    Type of evidence: 

    Source: 

    National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-products

    Year: 

    2014

    "The National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB), an algal biofuels research consortium, was formed to specifically address the objectives set forth by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE-EERE), Office of Biomass Programs (now called the Bioenergy Technologies Office, BETO), under the funding opportunity announcement DE-FOA-0000123, “Development of Algal/Advanced Biofuels Consortia”. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided the funds for this effort. In this announcement DOE sought consortia that would “...

    Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    Type of evidence: 

    Author names: 

    Energetics Incorporated

    Source: 

    US Department of Energy

    Year: 

    2014

    "This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Demonstration and Deployment (D&D) Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory. The workshop gathered stakeholders from industry, academia, national laboratories, and government to discuss the issues and potential for demonstration and deployment activities to pave the way for large-scale production of cost-competitive, renewable fuels from biomass resources. The ideas provided here represent a snapshot of the perspectives and ideas generated...

    Biodiesel produced by waste cooking oil: Review of recycling modes in China, the US and Japan

    Type of evidence: 

    Author names: 

    Huiming Zhang, U.AytunOzturk, QunweiWang, Zengyao Zhao

    Source: 

    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews

    Year: 

    2014

    "Waste cooking oil to biodiesel conversion efficiency depends on the recycling mode that is being practiced. The recycling modes in China, the US and Japan can be placed in two categories: third party take-back (TPT) and the biodiesel enterprise take-back (BET). We review the operation mechanisms of theses modes, their advantages and disadvantages in three countries and compare them using recycling costs and profits of biodiesel enterprises, subsidies for manufacturers, recycling rates, degree of administrative control, technical support and incentive mechanisms provided for the...