Biodiversity

The Circular Dairy Economy: Exploring the case for a farmer led, 'net positive' circular dairy sector

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

Circle Economy, FrieslandCampina

Source: 

Circle Economy

Year: 

2016

The report focuses is on a proposed move toward circularity in the dairy industry. Recognizing the strong possibility that growth due to increased demand for dairy products will be seen in the future, the report advocates that the dairy industry transition to a more circular economic model not only to reduce the industries ecological footprint but also to ensure that producers maintain their “their license to operate. Furthermore, the report examines three possible circular transition pathways and analyzes their proposed benefits, policy implementation possibilities, and potential barriers...

Resource-efficient green economy and EU policies

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

Roberto Zoboli, Susanna Paleari, Giovanni Marin, Massimiliano Mazzanti, Francesco Nicolli, Anna Montini, Valeria Miceli, Stefan Speck

Source: 

EEA

Year: 

2014

This report wants to contribute to a better understanding of the green economy and all the major forces and policies involved. It predominantly focuses on improving resource efficiency from a macro-economic perspective, for which eco-innovation is a primary enabling factor. However, the spread of technologies derived from eco-innovation often is obstructed by several barriers, such as finance, knowledge, costs, markets etc. Fiscal reforms, like environmental taxes and emission trading schemes are also crucial major enabling factors, but to what extent depends on their design (rebound...

Biofuels in the long-run global energy supply mix for transportation

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

Govinda R. Timilsina

Source: 

Philosophical Transaction od the Royal Society A

Year: 

2014

"Various policy instruments along with increasing oil prices have contributed to a sixfold increase in global biofuels production over the last decade (2000–2010). This rapid growth has proved controversial, however, and has raised concerns over potential conflicts with global food security and climate change mitigation. To address these concerns, policy support is now focused on advanced or second-generation biofuels instead of crop-based first-generation biofuels. This policy shift, together with the global financial crisis, has slowed the growth of biofuels production, which has...

Bioenergy: how much can we expect for 2050?

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

Helmut Haberl, Karl-Heinz Erb, Fridolin Krausmann, Steve Running, Timothy D Searchinger and W Kolby Smith

Source: 

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS

Year: 

2013

"Estimates of global primary bioenergy potentials in the literature span almost three orders of magnitude. We narrow that range by discussing biophysical constraints on bioenergy potentials resulting from plant growth (NPP) and its current human use. In the last 30 years, terrestrial NPP was almost constant near 54 PgC yr−1, despite massive efforts to increase yields in agriculture and forestry. The global human appropriation of terrestrial plant production has doubled in the last century. We estimate the maximum physical potential of the world's total land area outside croplands,...

Cascading use of biomass: opportunities and obstacles in EU policies

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

Sini Eräjää

Source: 

BirdLife and European Environmental Bureau

Year: 

2015

BirdLife Europe has been intensively working to highlight the environmental risks of using crops grown on agricultural land for fuel instead of food, resulting in significant emissions from indirect land use change (ILUC). This work resulted in the EU to limit the use of food based biofuels in the transport sector.  

Circulair bouwen

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

Sanderine van Odijk and Floor van Bovene

Source: 

Circle Economy, ABN AMRO

Year: 

2014

This report provides an overview of the Dutch construction and demolition sector in relation to the circular economy. To this end it addresses key isssues that arise due to resource-inefficiency and explores what a circular construction and demolition sector could look like. Furthermore, recommendations for the future are presented.

The New Plastics Economy: Rethinking the future of plastics

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

World Economic Forum, Ellen MacArthur Foundation, McKinsey & Company

Source: 

Year: 

2016

"The New Plastics Economy: Rethinking the future of plastics provides, for the first time, a vision of a global economy in which plastics never become waste, and outlines concrete steps towards achieving the systematic shift needed." (https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/publications/the-new-plastics-e...)

Food losses and waste in the context of sustainable food systems

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

The High Level Panel Experts on Food Security and Nutrition

Source: 

Year: 

2014

"The issue of global food losses and waste has recently received much attention and has been given high visibility. According to FAO, almost one-third of food produced for human consumption – approximately 1.3 billion tonnes per year – is either lost or wasted globally: their reduction is now presented as essential to improve food security and to reduce the environmental footprint of food systems. In this context, the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), in its Thirty-ninth Session (October 2012) requested the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE) to...

Circular Advantage: Innovative Business Models and Technologies to Create Value in a World without Limits to Growth

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

Accenture

Source: 

Accenture

Year: 

2014

This report mainly focuses on the question what companies can do to become more circular, and why it is in their best interest to do so. To this end, it among others discusses several business models, disruptive technologies and capabilities.

Environmental sustainability assessment of bioeconomy value chains

Type of evidence: 

Author names: 

Jorge Cristóbol et al.

Source: 

European Commission, JRC, IES

Year: 

2016

"The objectives of this work were: (1) to map and analyse accessible LCA data related to bioeconomy value chains in order to identify knowledge gaps; (2) provide a more robust and complete picture of the environmental performance of three bioeconomy value chains (i.e. one per each bioeconomy pillar). This analysis reveals that apart from few products (such as liquid biofuels, some biopolymers and food crops) the environmental assessment of bioeconomy value chains is still incipient and limited to few indicators (e.g. Global Warming Potential and energy efficiency). In this study, a...

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